IN THE NEWS

Croup

Croup

Croup is one of the diseases we own. This is the quintessential paediatric ED reg condition. Often the triage nurse will give the dex before you’ve even seen the patient. But have you thought about what you are going to do if the dex doesn’t work?

read more
Fast Friday #6 – Spinal Injury

Fast Friday #6 – Spinal Injury

A 30 year old bricklayer has fallen 3m off scaffolding onto the hard ground below and has been unable to mobilise since the incident. The patient presents complaining of back pain with associated altered motor function and sensation to his lower limbs. He is GCS 15 and his vital signs read a BP 80/40 mmHg, Heart Rate 47bpm, Oxygen Saturations of 100% on room air and his temperature is 37 degrees Celsius. He has warm hands and feet. On examination you notice that power of his lower limbs is 0/5 in all myotomes and he cannot appreciate sensation below the dermatome level of T4.

read more
Metabolic Alkalosis

Metabolic Alkalosis

It’s 4:20am on a night shift, and you’ve finally caught up with the waiting patient list. Just as you’re thinking about where you could source some caffeine, you see a 26 year old male come up on the screen. The triage note reads: “2/7 epigastric pain, can’t sleep tonight”. You barely get a chance to chart the pink lady when a nurse places a venous gas result in front of you.

read more
Ventilation of the Morbidly Obese Patient

Ventilation of the Morbidly Obese Patient

Imagine you’re on for resus in the middle of a night shift and you receive an alert for a shocked diabetic male with respiratory sepsis and DKA who has been intubated and will be arriving soon. Your initial reaction to this news probably wouldn’t worry you too much (aside from how severe the DKA must be to lead to a tube) knowing that the hard work has been done pre-hospital until the paramedic ends the call with a very casual, “Oh by the way the patient is 280kg.”

read more
Journal Club – July 2022

Journal Club – July 2022

We will review 3 papers today, covering topics of effectiveness of three antiepileptic drugs in treating toxin-related status epilepticus, use of Kelly clamps vs fine artery forceps in decompressing traumatic pneumothorax and haemothorax, as well as implicit gender bias during procedural competency assessments of emergency medicine trainees.

read more
Intractable Hiccups

Intractable Hiccups

A 72-year-old man presents to the emergency department with persistent hiccups for 4 days. As you walk over to his cubicle, you think back to all the different ways you’ve tried to cure your own hiccups. What does holding your breath, drinking water upside down and getting frightened have in common anyway?

read more